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Articles by Queen Elizabeth Hospital

The science of enduring pain. What can athletes and chronic pain patients learn from each other?

Published on: 11th July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8192130179

“It isn’t the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it’s the pebble in your shoe.” Muhammad Ali What mind strategies can an endurance athlete use to get their body that bit further or faster, to be a finisher? At “top-level” sport, some say it’s all in the mind!! When we push ourselves to the limit, we experience adversity. How and if we overcome that, will define us, and our achievements. “Adversity causes some men to break; others to break records.” William A. Ward (Inspirational Writer)
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Triathlon challenge – from craggy to crazzy a different kind of pain management program

Published on: 23rd July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8192141397

Ironman Wales sept 14th 2014 Sea swim (2.4 mile), bike ride (112 mile) and Marathon (26 mile), all in one day! There are lessons that the 7.8 million UK Chronic Pain patients can learn from the world of endurance sports, and vice versa [1]. The training, psychological tools and strategies used by athletes to complete an endurance event, are equally relevant for those with chronic pain, who wish to regain some form of “normal” life if treatment therapies have failed [2,3]. This is my reflection of how, using some of the techniques involved in Pain Management Programs, I trained for an Ironman Triathlon in just over one year.
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Mimicking multiple sclerosis - Ghost tumor that comes and goes in different parts of the brain without any treatment

Published on: 9th July, 2019

Lesions that spontaneously come and go in central nervous system without any treatment at different time points and at different locations (CNS) usually lead ones to think of the possibilities of multiple sclerosis. However, sometimes there are exceptions. Surgical biopsy remains an important tool for definitive diagnosis in difficult cases. We report a case of intracranial diffuse large B cell lymphoma that spontaneously disappeared without any treatment and then reappeared at different time points and different locations.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat